PGNiG will be a multi-energy company that is independent of Russian supplies. Interview with company’s CEO

Źródło: PGNiG

PGNiG’s CEO Jerzy Kwieciński has announced the company will invest in new projects and become fully independent of gas from Russia. He wants PGNiG to have a strong position on the international arena and as part of the European hydrogen alliance. Czytaj dalej„PGNiG will be a multi-energy company that is independent of Russian supplies. Interview with company’s CEO”

Will an Election or Pandemic Derail Poland-U.S. Energy Cooperation? Nope. Comment with Anna Mikulska

Tankowiec LNG w gazoporcie. Fot. PLNG
Tankowiec LNG w gazoporcie. Fot. PLNG

Over the last several years, Poland and the United States have become close allies when it comes to energy. The countries have been pursuing a common front against Russia’s dominance over Central and Eastern Europe, particularly natural gas supplies. This includes reciprocal visits by both country leaders and their energy ministers and signing memoranda on collaboration on the matter. In addition to governmental declarations, Poland’s state-owned oil and gas company has signed numerous contracts with U.S. LNG producers to bring in U.S. gas after 2022 as a replacement for Russian gas—when Poland’s long-term natural gas agreement with Russia expires. Czytaj dalej„Will an Election or Pandemic Derail Poland-U.S. Energy Cooperation? Nope. Comment with Anna Mikulska”

Nord Stream 2 may stay empty because of Poles

Budowa Nord Stream 2 w Rugii. Fot. Flickr
Budowa Nord Stream 2 w Rugii. Fot. Flickr

The German regulator Bundesnetzagentur decided that Poland’s PGNiG will be allowed to participate in the procedure where the controversial Nord Stream 2 project will apply for derogation from the EU Gas Directive. As long as the procedure is open, Russia will not be allowed to transmit gas via the pipeline – writes Wojciech Jakóbik, editor-in-chief at BiznesAlert.pl.

The Gas Directive was amended on the initiative of the European Commission due to the efforts by, among others, Warsaw. It brings the controversial NS2 gas pipeline between Germany and Russia under EU regulations, according to which the project will have to allow third party access, designate an operator independent of Gazprom and implement non-discriminatory tariffs. These regulations apply to all gas pipelines and the derogation is awarded only to those which had been completed before the amended directive entered into force on 23 May 2019. Despite this clear rule, Nord Stream 2 AG, the company behind the pipeline, has applied for a derogation.

PGNiG will be allowed to present its opinion during the NS2 derogation procedure. In the meantime the European Commission needs to investigate whether the project is in line with the EU law before the transmission starts. This means that without Brussels’ approval no gas will be allowed to flow via Nord Stream 2, which is delayed anyway as it was supposed to have launched at the end of 2019. Currently Nord Stream 2 AG is claiming the pipe will be ready by the end of 2020 or the first quarter of 2021. Without a decision from the EC, the company will not be allowed to transmit gas. A similar scenario may pertain to the derogation procedure in which PGNiG will participate. This may happen if Poles manage to secure a guarantee that the transmission will not start until the procedure is over. Such a situation took place during the dispute regarding the derogation of the German section of the Nord Stream 1 pipe (i.e. OPAL pipeline), which until the PGNiG guarantee was in force, Gazprom could use only at a reduced capacity.

In this scenario the procedure will take time rendering Nord Stream 2 useless and making it a burden on NS2 AG budget, a company that is completely owned by Russia’s Gazprom. The fact that the Gas Directive makes it possible for other projects to use the derogation may suggest the Russians will lose the dispute. However, they will most probably argue their project is discriminated against and allege that the amendment was in fact “lex Nord Stream 2” – a piece of legislation specifically designed to undermine their investment. However, the reality is that it is Gazprom that does not want to play by the rules and instead tries to keep its privileged position on the European market, a position it has abused at a number of occasions, the issues with the infamous Yamal contract with Poland being one example, which was confirmed during an EC antitrust investigation.

How to lose friends and alienate people or Germany on Nord Stream 2

Angela Merkel i Władimir Putin. Fot.: Kremlin.ru
Angela Merkel i Władimir Putin. Fot.: Kremlin.ru

Germany’s proceedings around Nord Stream 2 will not only hurt this country, but also European common policy as a whole from a security point of view. Additionally, they are undermining Germany’s already-fragile position as the European mediator and dealmaker.

Czytaj dalej„How to lose friends and alienate people or Germany on Nord Stream 2”

EU energy proposal could disrupt Russian pipeline construction. Comment for Axios

Rury Nord Stream 2. Fot.: Konsorcjum Nord Stream 2
Rury Nord Stream 2. Fot.: Konsorcjum Nord Stream 2

In a surprising move after months of inaction, the EU tentatively approved a compromise version of the European Commission (EC) proposal to extend provisions of a legislative framework for the EU’s gas and electricity market to pipelines to and from non-EU countries – write Anna Mikulska and Wojciech Jakóbik for Axios. Czytaj dalej„EU energy proposal could disrupt Russian pipeline construction. Comment for Axios”

Монополия России на газовом рынке Восточной Европы закончилась

Terminal LNG w Świnoujściu

Американо-польский контракт на поставки СПГ ставят Газпром в условия жесткой конкурентной борьбы.

Czytaj dalej„Монополия России на газовом рынке Восточной Европы закончилась”

Public Appeal of security experts from EU member states: 6 reasons Nord Stream 2 will be Germany’s strategic mistake for decades to come

Nord Stream. Grafika: Gazprom

The Russian government’s lobbying strategy is crystal clear – it wants to keep Western money flowing towards the Kremlin elite and increase its leverage against key European decision makers. Recent history only confirms that the Kremlin uses energy as a tool of blackmail. There is no reason why Moscow should change this strategy. Most Central and Eastern European countries understand this threat very well, but it seems that Russia’s lobbying efforts have been enormously successful in persuading the majority of Berlin’s political establishment to become allies in this energy game. Czytaj dalej„Public Appeal of security experts from EU member states: 6 reasons Nord Stream 2 will be Germany’s strategic mistake for decades to come”

EU Observer on BiznesAlert.pl leak: EU documents lay bare Russian energy abuse

Russian firm Gazprom has been strangling EU energy markets for years, documents show, as the European Commission takes aim at its new pipeline, Nord Stream 2. Czytaj dalej„EU Observer on BiznesAlert.pl leak: EU documents lay bare Russian energy abuse”

Forbes on BiznesAlert.pl leak: Is Germany Protecting Russia’s Gazprom From Latest Anti-Trust Discovery?

German gas transit system

German companies like BASF and Wintershall may be successful at lobbying their government to keep the new Russian pipeline going, despite opposition from Washington. Such are the worries being made behind closed doors within the state owned Central and East European (CEE) gas companies that are no fans of Russia’s Gazprom. Czytaj dalej„Forbes on BiznesAlert.pl leak: Is Germany Protecting Russia’s Gazprom From Latest Anti-Trust Discovery?”

The Telegraph on BiznesAlert.pl leak: files show Brussels cover-up and collusion on Putin’s Gazprom abuses

Vladimir Putin’s abusive stranglehold over European gas supplies has been laid bare by explosive EU documents, exposing deliberate violations of EU law and a pattern of political bullying over almost a decade.

The longest investigation in EU history found that the Kremlin-controlled energy giant Gazprom has used its enormous power to pressure vulnerable states in Eastern Europe, and to fragment the EU’s unified energy market with coercive pricing policies.

More: The Telegraph